Season 4 – 2013/2014

16 October 2013: L S Lowry

Lowry is probably Britain’s most popular artist yet this very familiarity has hindered a proper understanding of his extraordinary life and work. He painted not only the mill towns and cities of the industrial north-west for which he is so famous, but also many soulful landscapes and a number of masterly seascapes which are perhaps his greatest works

 Michael Howard: Michael is the Programme Leader in the School of the History of Art and Design at the Manchester Metropolitan University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and President of Bolton NADFAS and is a practising artist, painter, sculptor, printmaker and ceramicist. He is the author of a book that takes a fresh look at Lowry’s work and he worked on the film on the artist that acts as an introduction to the artist’s life and work at the Lowry Centre.

Sponsor: The Hon. Solomon Seruya OBE

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 20 November 2013: The ‘Wild Beasts’ of 1905 – Fauve and French Expressionist Painting

The French equivalent of German Expressionism is full of colour and a sense of joie de vivre, and artists such as Matisse and Derain caused a sensation when their works were exhibited alongside a classicised sculpture in Paris in 1905. A critic referred to the sculpture as “Donatello parmis les fauves” (Donatello among the wild beasts), giving the name to the movement.

 Frank Woodgate:  Making a welcome return, Frank is a lecturer and guide at Tate Britain and Tate Modern, and for Tate on cruises. He lectures at the Dulwich Picture Gallery and is a scriptwriter for the Living Paintings Trust (art for the blind and partially-sighted).

Sponsor:

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11 December 2013: Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Mackintosh is arguably the most important Scottish architect and designer of a period that spanned the years 1885-1915. This talk examines not only his architectural masterworks and interiors but also the all-important contribution of his wife and soul mate Margaret McDonald Mackintosh, alongside several other contemporaries from the Glasgow School of Art.

 Eric Knowles:  Eric, a well-known broadcaster with the BBC’s Antiques Roadshow, has over 25 years’ experience lecturing to audiences in museums and galleries around the world, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, British Museum, and the Art Deco Society of New York, as well as to countless antique societies in the UK.

Sponsor:

 

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15 January 2014: Venice in 18th Century London – a Musical and Artistic Partnership

As the powers of Venice declined in the 18th century many of its artists and musicians looked for work elsewhere and, perhaps inspired by the many young Englishmen on the Grand Tour, they came to London.  With examples sung and played at the piano, Peter Medhurst reveals how English culture took on a discernible Venetian quality that was to be detected in its art and music for many years to come.

 Peter Medhurst: Peter appears in the UK and abroad as a musician and scholar, giving recitals and delivering illustrated lectures on music and the arts. He studied singing and early keyboard instruments at the Royal College of Music and at the Mozarteum in Salzburg.

Sponsor:

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19 February 2014: John Ruskin and the Pre-Raphaelites

The Pre-Raphaelites painted every inch of the canvas with equal intensity and, unlike their predecessors, often worked out of doors nose-close to nature. For example, William Holman Hunt painted ‘Our English Coasts’ in 1852 with every motif up close. These landscapes were extolled by art critic John Ruskin who gained Hunt a circle of admirers both in England and across the channel. This talk will examine the revolution in landscape painting which occurred during the 1850s and the rising interest in the sciences of meteorology, geology, and botany.

 Heather Birchall: Author of a book on the Pre-Raphaelites, Heather is an art historian who has been the Curatorial Assistant at the V&A and Assistant Curator at Tate Britain and, until January 2011, she was the Curator of Historic Fine Art at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester where she managed the collection of historic watercolours & prints and supported the programme of fine art exhibitions.

Sponsor: tbc.

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19 March 2014: ‘Beauty & the Bizarre’: The Art of Hellenistic Greece

The response to Greek art of the Hellenistic period (between Alexander the Great and Cleopatra) is often ambiguous: is it the pinnacle of Greek achievement, or is it the artistic expression of a decaying, decadent culture? By shedding light on stunning works like the Venus di Milo, the Colossus of Rhodes, and the Great Altar of Zeus at Pergamon, as well as exploring some of the era’s finest architectural achievements, this talk will look at the defining features of Greek art and architecture during the period.

 Dr. Stephen Kershaw:  As a Classics Tutor for the Oxford University Department for Continuing Education, Professor of History of Art for the European Studies Program of Rhodes College and The University of the South and as a guest speaker on cruise ships, Stephen has spent much of the last 30 years travelling extensively in the world of the Greeks and Romans both physically and intellectually. Published works include ‘A Brief Guide to the Greek Myths’, ‘A Brief Guide to Classical Civilization’ and he is currently working on ‘A Brief Guide to the Roman Empire’.

Sponsor:

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9  April 2014: Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome

Raphael died in Rome on Good Friday, 1520, aged only 37. The Pope, his most prestigious patron, was devastated and earth tremors were felt around the city. He was buried in the Pantheon – Rome’s most important classical building – a fitting tribute to an artist who rivalled the greatness of the Ancients. This lecture looks at his short, but astonishing career as painter, architect, administrator and superb draughtsman and considers his lasting influence on subsequent artists.

Jo Walton:  After university Jo began teaching and lecturing, combining this with a career in art bookselling. She set up and ran the Atrium Bookshop in Cork Street – the heart of London’s art world – and worked with Christie’s, the fine art auctioneers. Jo now combines freelance lecturing with work in publishing and as a guide at Tate Modern and Tate Britain.

Sponsor:

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21 May 2014: ‘Hand Grenades like Cartier Clips’ – Lee Miller

Two genres shaped the life of Lee Miller, Surrealism and the world of fashion. They informed each other and were both central to the way she saw the world. Lee became the model for Lepape, Steichen, Genthe, Man Ray, Hoyningen Heune, Horst, Picasso and Roland Penrose – later to be her husband. She emerged as a fashion photographer in her own right, metamorphosing into a war correspondent and finally a combat photographer before returning to her role as a distinctive and witty photographer for Vogue in the post war years. 

 Antony Penrose: After his brilliant lecture to us at the end of last season, Antony, the son of Lee Miller and Roland Penrose, is making a popular return with a follow-on talk about Lee Miller. He has lectured at venues around the world, including the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Getty Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Stedjlik, Amsterdam, and Gallery of Photography in Dublin. For the last 25 years he has run the Lee Miller Archives and the Penrose Collection, located at Farley Farm House, Sussex

Sponsor:

ease note that this Programme may be subject to changes before the season starts. Lectures will be held at the O’Callaghan Eliott Hotel at 7.30pm

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