Season 2 – 2011/12

Season 2011-12

19th October 2011:         MEN BEHAVING BADLY – ROGUES ON AND OFF THE CANVAS

John Iddon – Lecturer and Guide at both Tate Britain and Tate Modern, John has also lectured to the National Trust, the Peggy Guggenheim Gallery in Venice, for Cunard and the Tate on P&O Cruises

 Men have often been shown as behaving badly, frequently at the expense of women. From Hogarth’s ‘Rake’s Progress’ through to other rakes portrayed by Reynolds or featuring in Pre-Raphaelite and Victorian narrative paintings, the lecture will look at some of the artists themselves, and finally show how women strike back.

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 16th November 2011:      ARCHITECTS AS DESIGNERS – FURNITURE, CERAMICS, METALWORK FROM FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT TO NORMAN FOSTER

Marina Vaizey – Curator, author, editor, Marina has been a member of the Arts Council and the Crafts Council, trustee of several museums and an esteemed Art Critic for over 30 years for various publications, including The Financial Times and The Sunday Times

 Marinawill tell us how architects, from the Arts and Crafts movement to Art Nouveau, and from the modernism of Mies van der Rohe to the flamboyant designs of Frank Gehry, have contributed to the decorative arts in unusual and fascinating ways

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 14th December 2011:       MONET AND THE IMPRESSIONISTS

 – ‘THE JOY AND THE TORMENT’

Douglas Skeggs – One of our favourite lecturers, he is a writer and presenter of TV documentaries, an artist and author of five novels. His book on Monet ‘River of Light’ has sold 30,000 copies worldwide.

 Ambitious, determined and stubborn, Monet was the driving force of Impressionism. InParis, he met Renoir, Sisley, Pissaro, Bazille, and eventually Manet who asked them to join his friends at the Café Guerbois. They group became known as the Impressionists. Monet created images of such light and beauty that it is easy to forget that they are also the substance of one of the greatest revolutions in the visual arts.

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 18th January 2012:         PAINTINGS INSPIRED BY MUSIC –

AND MUSIC INSPIRED BY PAINTINGS

Peter Medhurst – Popular NADFAS lecturer, musician and scholar, he studied singing and early keyboard instruments at the Royal College of Music and at the Mozarteum in Saltzburg. The presentation by Peter will be a lecture-recital.

 It has long been recognised that the worlds of the visual and aural arts link with extraordinary power when one medium inspires the other.  This lecture spans over 600 years of the arts, analyses and discusses a range of related works, bringing together (amongst others) the music of Martinu with the frescoes of Piero della Francesca, and Botticelli’s Birth of Venus with Respighi’s Trittico botticelliano.

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 15th February 2012:         THE MAGNIFICENCE OF ANCIENT PERSIA – THE ART OF ISFAHAN, SHRIAZ AND ANCIENT PERSEPOLIS

Christopher Bradley – Author, lecturer and expert in the history and culture of the Middle East and North Africa, he has travelled extensively through these areas and led groups as an adventure tour leader. . As a film producer and cameraman he has made documentaries for the BBC, National Geographic TV and Channel 4.Christopher returns to us after his well-received lecture in 2009.

 Ancient monuments ofPersia, likePersepolis, are a blend of styles fromEgypt,GreeceandIndia. In the 17th Century, Persian Islamic art reached unparalleled heights, especially atIsfahan, which still delights visitors today.

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 21ST March 2012:             DREAMTIME TO MACHINE TIME -AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ART

Rebecca Hossack – Lecturer, art gallery owner, and champion of Aboriginal and Non Western Art, Rebecca was born in Melbourne and came to England in the 80’s.  She studied at Christies, and owns two art galleries in London. Between 1993 and 1997 Rebecca served as the Australian cultural attaché in London.

Aboriginal Art is the oldest continuous artistic tradition in the world and, revitalised by the use of modern medium, has spread across the Australian desert. The aboriginal people’s deep reverence for the land and all that comes from it is read through the symbols and signs of these paintings, responsible for a renaissance in Aboriginal people’s pride in their remarkable culture.

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 18th April 2012:               EL GRECO AND TOLEDO

Sian Helen Walters  – Lecturer at the National Gallery and Surrey University specialising in 15th and16th century Italian painting and Spanish Art & Architecture.

Known as El Greco (the Greek) because he was born in Crete, he was one of the great masters of Spanish painting. Toledo was the religious capital of Spain and El Greco’s ‘View of Toledo’ is a landscape painting with a spiritual dimension. El Greco was not simply an old master; he was an artist from the past whose ideas were three hundred years ahead of their time.

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 16th May 2012:   GUSTAV KLIMT: FIN DE SIÉCLE SENSUALIST

Eric Shanes – Lecturer and recently retired Chairman of the Turner Society, Eric is the author of 13 bestselling books on Turner and many other artists, and comes back to de la Frontera by popular request.

Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), painting genius and pioneer of the Modern era around 1900, would have celebrated his 150th birthday in 2012. He revolutionized the art of painting and his best known work ‘The Kiss’ can be seen to stand for the start of the new modern era. His extraordinary portraits of women document the rise of the middle classes.  Although controversial, his works continue to fascinate to this day.

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